The future is orbital says NLA Debate at the London Transport Museum

Saturday 28 January 2017

In the London Transport Museum’s Transportorium, located between a big red bus and a Hackney cab, NLA debated the future of the capital’s transport network at the “late debate” last week.

Industry experts and citizens descended on the museum for a night of transport themed frivolity where simultaneous debates and workshops took place amongst the relics of London’s transport system. No better setting for a discussion on the future of London’s transport than its past!
 
An NLA City Mapper - a big scale transport map of London with string and pins! - brought in the crowds as people mapped their journeys from home to work. All string pointed inwards as Londoners still migrate to the centre for work - the lack of connections between outer London communities being the root of the problem. 
 
This was the key message to come out of the NLA led debate on the transport network’s ability to connect and forget communities. We must use transport to open up and connect new pieces of city and human interactions must remain at the heart of how we design for transport - from stations to the areas surrounding them.
 
Our own Peter Murray was joined by Declan McCafferty from Grimshaw, Joanne Farrar from Atkins, Sam Richards from Crossrail, Professor Nick Tyler and Michael Schabas, author of The Railway Metropolis, for a dynamic discussion which covered a range of issues from the curation of clusters around transport hubs in order to retain local diverse economies, to the impact of driverless cars. In the end, the question of whether increased automation makes us feel safer divided the room - interesting when everyone agreed that human interaction is at the heart of any successful city, yet the rate of automation is rapidly increasing.
 
Stay tuned for events around automation and how driverless cars will change our city in the NLA Transport and Infrastructure Programme. And look out for more events at the London Transport Museum here

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