10 winning ideas announced!

New Ideas for Housing - International Ideas Competition

Buoyant Starts Floating Homes © Baca Architects

Ten ideas have been selected as winners of the NLA international ideas competition New Ideas for Housing to help solve the London housing shortage.

From building on top of public buildings, to densifying the suburbs, living in shared homes to living on the water and creating a megacity in the suburbs, the 10 ideas provide a radical rethinking of current housing delivery models.

The winning ideas will be presented to the Greater London Authority who will study their feasibility as options for the future of the London housing market.

The competition, which launched in June 2015, invited anyone to submit an idea that would help to improve the speed, scale and quality of housing supply. Ideas could be small-scale or large in their ambition, but when brought together would make a significant contribution to the delivery of quality housing in the capital. It attracted over 200 entries from 16 countries around the world, from world-renowned architects, developers, consultants, local boroughs and everyday city residents.

100 shortlisted ideas were selected by an expert jury, including both practical and more radical ideas: from increasing self-building and co-housing, to building over infrastructure assets, infilling council estates, and densifying the suburbs. All winning and shortlisted ideas are on display in a free public exhibition New Ideas for Housing at the NLA galleries in The Building Centre from 15 October to 17 December.

The competition forms part of a wider NLA Insight Study examining London's housing crisis, supported by a three month programme of events.

The Jury Toggle

  • Isabel Allen – Design Director, HAB Housing

  • Richard Blakeway, Deputy Mayor for Housing, Land and Property

  • Alison Brooks, Principal, Alison Brooks Architects

  • Robert Evans,Partner, Argent

  • Hilary French, Architectural Historian

  • Daniel Gray, Director, Engineering Excellence, Laing O’Rourke 

  • Lord Bob Kerslake, Chair, London Housing Commission

  • Daniel Lovatt, Head of Property Development, Transport for London

  • Peter Murray, Chairman, New London Architecture

The Insight Study Toggle

The competition forms a core part of NLA’s forthcoming Autumn Insight Study, exploring new ideas to deliver quality housing at speed and at scale in London. Alongside a major new piece of research exploring London’s housing market, the shortlisted and winning ideas will form the basis of an NLA exhibition, publication and accompanying events programme, hosted at NLA’s galleries in The Building Centre from 15 October – 17 December 2015.

If you have an enquiry about the competition please contact Jenine Hudson 

For information on sponsoring the Insight Study please contact Laura Bushby

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Winning Ideas Toggle

The Urban Darning Project

by Patrick J.A. Massey, CZWG

Employing the sewing technique for repairing holes or worn areas in fabric, The Urban Darning Project aims to encourage small residential developments in central London to ‘fill-in the gaps’ of the urban fabric. Each London borough commissions a team of planners and architects to work collaboratively to produce a strategic report, which not only identifies desirable sites for development, but crucially produces a set of schematic annotated drawings for each site showing the nature and scale of development desired by the local authority. The report will focus on extension, infill and end condition sites which have the potential to be developed into additional residential units. Attaching a set of approved schematic drawings to a site will significantly reduce the risk of not obtaining planning permission, as the site has already effectively had an outline planning analysis, and will therefore act as a catalyst for development.

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Housing over public assets

by Bill Price, WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff

There is room for 630,000 new homes in London by building apartments above public buildings, such as hospitals, schools and libraries. This would comfortably meet the projected 488,000 homes that will be needed in the capital in the next decade whilst simultaneously improving public facilities. To achieve this, the private sector would refurbish or fully rebuild a hospital, library or school – paid for by adding several floors of apartments above the new facility that could be rented or sold. The idea has examples, existing expertise and public support from Londoners keen to remain in the city.

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Supurbia

by HTA Design LLP

Supurbia is a strategy for intensifying London’s suburbs that balances their inherent advantages with higher density and amenity value. Its approach is twofold: redeveloping the local main streets and parades as mixed-use places with increased housing and amenity provision; and allowing owner-occupiers of semi-detached homes to develop their land, creating rich diversities of housing. The strategy will bring together local authorities and communities to plan appropriate developments, and allow homeowners to release equity in their land for home improvements. It will also reduce reliance on mainstream developers to ease the housing crisis, providing an approach that is more adaptable to communities’ needs. Assuming a mere doubling of density per plot, this realises 16,800 new homes per year, or 40 per cent of London’s projected housing need for the next 20 years.

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Intimate Infrastructures

by Natasha Reid Design

In response to the drastic urban changes occurring in east London, an alternative to more dominant forms of volume housebuilding is proposed, which provides solutions for both private renters in the form of purpose built shared homes, as well as considering the needs of local communities vulnerable to displacement. The project addresses a ‘missing typology’ of purpose-built shared housing to meet the demand of private renters in the immediate term, while also accommodating larger family homes within a framework that focuses on qualities of place and mixing tenures. New massproduced, modular ‘shared houses’ are proposed as standardised components, to speed up delivery, reduce construction costs and regulate minimum levels of space standards. Based on the London pattern of streets and squares, permanent infrastructure would be provided at ground level in the form of a courtyard and terraces townhouses, to embed more permanent groups into the city fabric.

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Buoyant Starts

by Floating Homes Ltd with Baca Architects

Our idea addresses the housing crisis in Greater London by providing high quality prefabricated floating homes, at an affordable price, for the unused water space of the capital. There are approximately 50 linear miles of rivers and canals forming the waterways network of the Greater London area, and an additional 150 hectares of developable waterspace in the city’s docks, marinas, and basins that we call ‘bluespace’ or ‘bluefield’ sites. Currently underused, this bluespace has the potential to deliver as many as 7,500 prefabricated floating starter homes with minimal disruption to existing communities. ‘Generation Rent’ becomes ‘Generation Float’.

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Investing in London’s Future by Learning from its Past

by David Kroll

The basic principles of this idea draw on a well-known system of housing development from London’s past - the leasehold system. Separating the cost of housing as a physical product from land costs would make it more affordable to build and buy houses. Suitable public land could be released to build housing, but it would not be sold off to private developers. Instead, it would remain in public ownership. What is being privately contracted out is only the planning and construction of the buildings. The leasehold to the houses or flats can then be sold for the amount that it actually costs to develop and build them, which is affordable to most Londoners. Those who purchase the dwellings would then pay an additional, stable ‘ground rent’ for the land. The level of such a rent can be set strategically and with social sustainability in mind. The ground rent could be smaller, for example, for young families who are first-time buyers.

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Mega Planning, Beyond 2050 – MegaPlan for a MegaCity

by GL Hearn part of Capita plc

By 2050, London’s population growth will make it western Europe’s first MegaCity, and mega planning is required to implement a radical step change in housing delivery. Assuming densification alone will not solve London’s long-term requirement for new homes, our MegaPlan looks beyond this and seeks to maximise potential land supply across ‘Edge Land’ – the inner belt running from the inner London Green Belt to the M25. Green Belt land within the M25 (including London) totals 86,000 hectares. Over three quarters of Edge Land is therefore designated as Green Belt, and almost one third of this land is covered by primary environmental, landscape or heritage designations. In order to meet the shortfall in housing, less than four per cent of Edge Land would need to be released from the Green Belt. This approach would be underpinned by a strategic Green Belt review, to positively plan for a sustainable pattern of growth.

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ATAL Opportunity Areas

by Brendan Cuddihy, Arup, and Rupesh Varsani, Craigewan

ATAL ‘Active Transport Accessibility Level’ is our concept for unlocking housing density in parts of London with poor public transport provision. The London Plan limits housing density across London based on the area’s Public Transport Accessibility Level (PTAL). This makes sense from a public transport led sustainability perspective, but it leaves large swathes of London where higher densities cannot be realised, thereby supressing the provision of new homes. By shifting the focus from ‘transport accessibility’ to ‘active transport’, we can improve accessibility from these parts of London to enable a higher yet moderate housing density to unlock new supply. Achieving a high ATAL will allow for a doubling of development density in over half of London, subject to the provision of high quality walking and cycling infrastructure. Housebuilders will be encouraged to bring forward development through the GLA designating ‘ATAL Opportunity Areas’, with planning incentives stimulating the development of these areas.

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Making more with less: unlocking leftover land for generation rent

by Pitman Tozer, LB Enfield and Naked House

Naked House is a new generation not-for-profit housing provider that unlocks the vast array of small, under-used council-owned sites throughout London to build genuinely affordable homes for those on intermediate incomes. Individually, these sites may be insignificant, but taken together, they can help solve London’s intermediate housing shortage. Naked House acts as developer, taking on the developer risk and managing the process throughout, allowing us to jump many of the barriers to such schemes and provide a scalable model. The council propose to realise long-term value through a ground rent linked to the value of the land (and so any uplift in value is shared), the guaranteed provision of permanently affordable intermediate housing (a resale covenant locks in affordability for perpetuity), additional council tax receipts, etc. Naked House will unlock the potential of small infill sites across London, to provide as many as 110,000 fully-affordable customisable homes by 2025.

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Wood Blocks

by dRMM Architects

A new shell and core housing typology should be used to build homes, adapting a tried and tested development model from office buildings. It ‘scales up’ the growing appetite for self-build as a more affordable typology and as way of creating the home Londoners really want. Shell and core provides ‘ready to camp in’ housing: a structural, weatherproof, thermally- and acoustically-insulated shell which you can then partition and fit-out however you want. Excluding internal fit-outs could reduce the cost (to the developer/house-builder) of building new homes by 40 per cent, and the duration of construction by 25 per cent – delivering faster, cheaper housing.

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Shortlisted Ideas Toggle

[nest]

by Stride Treglown Limited

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100 Ways to Use 100 sqm

by Levitt Bernstein

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21C LIVING CONCEPT

by BMM MODULAR SOLUTIONS

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A Housing Solution with Legs!

by Urban Space Management

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A NEW LIFE LINE: Densifying Housing Estates

by Grimshaw

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Affordable Housing Levy – An alternative to the viability process

by Marsh & Parsons

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An Infinite Solution

by RICL Studio

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ATAL OPPORTUNITY AREAS

by THE ATAL TEAM

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Better than New

by MOCT Studio

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Bridging East London

by Farrells and Buro Happold

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Bringing together complementary land uses to unlock increased housing supply

by WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff

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Build to Rent – Making it Work

by Savills and Stanhope

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Building Blocks

by Catherine White Interiors

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Buoyant Starts

by Floating Homes Ltd with Baca Architects

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Canal Housing

by Mae Architects

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Capital Project

by The Hylozoist Union

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City in a Building

by Teatum + Teatum

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Co-Lateral Living

by Tibbalds Planning, Urban Design and Henley Halebrown Rorrison Architects

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Collective

by Camden Town Unlimited and Sheppard Robson Architects

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Community Chest

by Levitt Bernstein, WSMS Studio and University of Texas at Austin

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Community Led Intensification

by Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios

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CONNECT

by Lipton Plant Architects

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Connected Living: Modern Mews for Symbiotic Communities

by tp Bennett

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CONSENT AND IMPLEMENT

by Crispin Kelly

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CROSSRAIL AT THE CROSSROADS

by Carter Jonas

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Custom Build

by Igloo

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Custom Build > Custom Development

by Edgley Design Limited

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Disco

by Ben Adams Architects

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Finch Buildings

by Finch Buildings B.V. – the Netherlands

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Find The Gap

by Grimshaw

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Find The Gap

by Child Graddon Lewis

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Floatopolis

by dRMM Architects

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Fluid Housing

by Jonathan Hawkshaw

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G A P H O U S I N G

by Akira Yamanaka Architect

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GET SMALLER!

by The Manser Practice Architects + Designers

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Greater London Estate

by Jonathan Manns, Colliers International

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GREEN URBAN CENTRES

by Rock Townsend Architects

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Grow London!

by Waugh Thistleton Architects

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Growing London – a plan for smarter, more competitive, resilient city

by Smart Growth Associates

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High density housing in low PTAL neighbourhoods

by Vincent Stops

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Home Performance Labelling

by HTA Design LLP

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HOUSE+GARDEN+HOUSE: A new suburban code for London

by Pierre d'Avoine Architects

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Housing over public assets

by WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff

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How do you solve London’s housing crisis? Start by relaxing restrictions on density…

by WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff

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Hyperdensity

by AWP office for territorial reconfiguration

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Innovation License

by Baca Architects

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Intimate Infrastructures

by Natasha Reid Design

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Investing in London's Future

by Learning from its Past by David Kroll

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Let’s unblock the market: A new rental model for London

by Assael

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Livinhome

by Geraghty Taylor Architects

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Living Arteries

by Benjamin Marks

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LONDON FABRICation: Ideas, tools and tactics to scale the potential of housing in the capital

by Smart Urbanism: Urban Research and Development Collaborative

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London's Corridors

by Barbara Weiss Architects / Allies and Morrison

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Making more with less: unlocking leftover land for generation rent

by Pitman Tozer, LB Enfield and Naked House

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Mayfair New Town

by Guy Rochez

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Mega Planning: Beyond 2050 - MegaPlan for a MegaCity

by GL Hearn part of Capita Ltd

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MINISTRY OF DENSIFICATION OF SUBURBIA (MODS)

by Hal Architects Limited

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Modular Mobile Housing

by USE Architects

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Monad - Parametric Housing

by LWPAC - Lang Wilson Practice in Architecture Culture Inc

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MULTIPLY LONDON: Space and Time

by ENSEMBLE Urbem | Elemental | Ratti | Triptyque

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New High Streets for London

by ROEWU architecture

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NuVENTURE HOMES

by Nuhaus Systems Ltd

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OBJECTIVES IN COMMONS

by CULLINAN STUDIO

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OpenPlan Interface

by PHASE3 Architecture and Design

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Own Build

by Savills

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PAYD Housing for London

by Mobile Studio Architects

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Pocket Regen

by Pocket

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Rational House

by AECOM

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Really Free Schools

by Denizen Works

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RedefinedLiving

by Ryder Architecture

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Reinstating Community Living

by David Morley Architects

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Relax / Strengthen

by Barbara Weiss Architects / Allies and Morrison

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Right to Replace

by Alastair Parvin and Adam Towle in partnership with WikiHouse Foundation

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Rooftop (Re)Generation

by Bell Philips Architects

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Room To Grow

by HLM Architects

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Semi-permissive

by Pollard Thomas Edwards and Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners

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Shareditch

by Stephanie Adebayo

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Solidspace Connect. We have the brand. We need the land. Let’s Partner

by Solidspace

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Spacebox – Movable, stacked homes

by Gainsgrove Ltd

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Streets count

by Stitch

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Supurbia

by HTA Design LLP

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Terrace Upcycle

by Adams + Collingwood Architects

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TFL Transforming London – living above your station

by Burrell Foley Fischer

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The All-Electric City

by WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff

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The Helix

by SimpsonHaugh and Partners LLP

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The High Street Living Project

by A-ZERO architects

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THE INFINITE HOUSE

by Openstudio Architects

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The London Multi Detached

by Maccreanor Lavington

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The Rookery – A new (old) idea for housing

by Projects Office

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The Streets

by NBBJ

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The Tree House – The Nano Rise

by HutLab Design Gregory Kewish Design

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The Urban Darning Project

by CZWG Architects LLP

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The Urban Edge

by STUDIO SE5

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TONY: Together Old’N’Young

by BR+W

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Tramland

by Coffey Architects

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Tric-Trac players

by PROJECT2

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Umbrellahaus

by Chapman Taylor

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Unlocking housing delivery

by London Forum of Amenity and Civic Societies

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Wood Blocks

by dRMM Architects

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Y:Cube

by Rogers Stirk Harbour + partners

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Related Content, Events and News Toggle

New Ideas for Housing London - Insight Study Overview

NLQ

NLA’s Autumn Insight Study, New Ideas for Housing, explores what needs to happen in the capital to improve the speed, scale and quality of housing. Independent research, backed up by a major international ideas competition inviting innovative thinking from across the industry, form the basis of a public exhibition, publication and programme of events, taking place from 15 October - 17 December 2015.

Other Insight Study Elements:

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Housing London 2012

Exhibition

London's population is growing and the capital needs to build around 36,000 new homes a year just to keep pace with the number of new households.

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Housing Showcase 2012

Publication

This Publication supported the Housing London exhibition, which looked at how well the capital was keeping up with its targets, who was delivering new homes, the funding and policy context, exemplar projects, and new and imaginative ideas for designing and delivering new homes for London.

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100 shortlisted ideas announced!

News

From self-build communities to a mega-city near the M25 – New London Architecture unveils 100 ideas to solve the London housing crisis and provide a blueprint for 21st century city living

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